Facebook’s Easter Egg Contra and Apps That Show Profit

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Since Everyone Loved Digg For Frames Facebook Follows Suit

There’s two things to remember about Easter eggs: they’re usually hidden in plain sight and they often have goodies in them.

By now, most already know that the Contra Code will create a screen flare effect in Facebook.  If you didn’t know this, you should try it.  Log into Facebook and use the Konami code: up up down down left right left right b a (enter).  Now wherever your mouse is on the screen will have a flare.  Fun!

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To see the Contra Code in action on Facebook without using it on your account, go check out the short video posted by AllFacebook.com on their blog.

There are other Easter eggs on Facebook that aren’t as well known too.

One is the pirate language filter.  Go to your language options (usually bottom-left, under the Applications tab; or under Settings-Language, top right).  Sure enough, a Pirate Language option is there.  This ads a lot of “Arrrg” and “ye mateys” to your screen.

Another is hidden text, which is found all over the site.  This is the “white on white” text that used to be used by spammers in the old days to hide massive numbers of search keywords on the page to boost rankings.  On Facebook, they’re usually funny axioms.  Pick a friend and go to their friends list, then scroll down to the white space separator between the page navigation list.  Highlight that white space.  Quails with the what now?

For a more thorough look at Facebook Easter eggs and apps, check out the Easter Egg area on Mashable.

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Amazingly, all this fun and excitement is even profitable.  Well, maybe the Easter eggs aren’t specifically, but Facebook itself and even the game makers who create the little Facebook plugin games are showing profit.  Facebook on its own is well on its way towards a $500 million revenue year.  The little games that plug into it (like the ever-popular Mob Wars) are set to do the same too.

VentureBeat is reporting that between them, the little apps on Facebook like Mob Wars, Texas Hold’Em Poker, etc. are poised to pull in about half a billion in revenue this year.  That’s not insignificant, especially given that most people view these games as mere gimmicks and “codes of love.”  Turns out, they’re pretty big business.

Hopefully this doesn’t mean that Facebook will become inundated with them like Myspace has.  Or at least that these apps don’t take over the site and fill your screen with constant advertising and popups.  That was my main reason for leaving Myspace.  Apparently, I’m not alone.