Twitter’s First TV Commercial

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Capitalizing on America’s fastest-growing televised sport, Twitter began a slew of Nascar-based (or should we say #NASCAR based) ads during the 2012 Pocono 400.  The ad features driver Brad Kaselowski using his phone to share his point of view with the world.

Brad finished 24th in the race, by the way. Not a very promising start if Twitter wants to get into racing itself, but the commercials are a good beginning for the social media giant.

A series of ads then commenced, both online and off, promoting the #NASCAR hashtag, which has its own page on Twitter now at http://twitter.com/#nascar.  That leads to a NASCAR branded page which syndicates tweets using the tag.  It’s the first of what will likely be many corporate-sponsored hashtag pages on Twitter.

The hashtag plan for NASCAR was announced last week by the Twitter Sports & Entertainment Team, which shows that the company is getting serious about that kind of advertising.  Team lead Omid Ashtari explained how the hashtag pages work in a blog post last week:

Throughout the weekend – but especially during the race – a combination of algorithms and curation will surface the most interesting Tweets to bring you closer to all of the action happening around the track, from the garage to the victory lane.Anyone watching the Pocono 400 on Sunday — even if you’re not a current Twitter user — can visit twitter.com/#NASCAR watch the race unfold from every angle, and get insider access to all the places the cameras can’t take you. For example, teams will update you with information about how their car is performing in the race and what their strategy will be when they come into pit road. You’ll also see photos from the pit and read what the drivers and spotters are saying in the heat of the moment.

The use of hashtags in commercials on TV and billboards is not unusual anymore and Twitter would have been remiss had they not tried to capitalize on that as a marketing plan.

Here’s the first commercial aired, called Brad’s View: